NURSERY CRHYMES – Read all about it!

THREE BLIND MICE

 

Three Blind Mice The origin of the ‘tale’ of Three blind mice!

The origin of the words to the Three blind mice rhyme are based in English history. The ‘farmer’s wife’ refers to the daughter of King Henry VIII, Queen Mary I. Mary was a staunch Catholic and her violent persecution of Protestants led to the nickname of ‘Bloody Mary‘. The reference to ‘farmer’s wife’ in Three blind mice refers to the massive estates which she, and her husband King Philip of Spain, possessed.

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Three Blind Mice

Three blind mice, three blind mice,
See how they run, see how they run!

They all ran after the farmer’s wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife,

Did you ever see such a thing in your life,
As three blind mice?

JACK AND JILL

Jack and Jill story – The French (history) connection!
The roots of the story, or poem, of Jack and Jill are in France. Jack and Jill referred to are said to be King Louis XVI – Jack -who was beheaded (lost his crown) followed by his Queen Marie Antoinette – Jill – (who came tumbling after). The words and lyrics to the Jack and Jill poem were made more acceptable as a story for children by providing a happy ending! The actual beheadings occurred in during the Reign of Terror in 1793. The first publication date for the lyrics of Jack and Jill rhyme is 1795 – which ties-in with the history and origins. The Jack and Jill poem is also known as Jack and Gill – the mis-spelling of Gill is not uncommon in nursery rhymes as they are usually passed from generation to generation by word of mouth.

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Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a pail of water
Jack fell down and broke his crown
And Jill came tumbling after.
Up got Jack, and home did trot
As fast as he could caper
He went to bed and bound his head
With vinegar and brown paper
.


REMEMBER REMEMBER

Guy Fawkes & the Gunpowder Plot
Words of “Remember Remember” refer to Guy Fawkes with origins in 17th century English history. On the 5th November 1605 Guy Fawkes was caught in the cellars of the Houses of Parliament with several dozen barrels of gunpowder. Guy Fawkes was subsequently tried as a traitor with his co-conspirators for plotting against the government. He was tried by Judge Popham who came to London specifically for the trial from his country manor Littlecote House in Hungerford, Gloucestershire. Fawkes was sentenced to death and the form of the execution was one of the most horrendous ever practised (hung, drawn and quartered) which reflected the serious nature of the crime of treason.

Read more HERE and HERE

Remember Remember

“Remember remember the fifth of November
Gunpowder, treason and plot.
I see no reason why gunpowder, treason
Should ever be forgot…”

NURSERY RHYMESΒ Β  – CHILD FRIENDLY VERSIONS

HUMPTY DUMPTY

HUMPTY DUMPTY
HUMPTY DUMPTY NURSERY RHYME

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TWINKLE TWINKLE LITTLE STAR

Phototastic-09_07_2017_5fed7cd3-ebbb-481e-aab8-ea0c52e0cd5c

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BAA BAA BLACK SHEEP

BAA BAA BLACK SHEEP LINE TRACING
BAA BAA BLACK SHEEP LINE TRACING

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HICKORY DICKORY DOCK

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TEN GREEN BOTTLES

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